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spending. he went from 70% support down to below 50% and lost the house. now he gets re-elected with less strength, not against a war hero but a guy from massachusetts, and the republicans have the house and he thinks somebody made him king and he's going to have more taxes, more spending, and more regulations. it's a real problem for him. he doesn't have the mandate he thinks he does. so i think he takes us over the cliff because he doesn't -- he's got blinders on. he doesn't see where he stands in the universe. >> okay. there are a couple things to unpack here. i want to go back to this question -- i think what i'm confused about is this kind of game of smoke and mirrors that seems to be playing out on the right. and i ask you again, is closing a loophole and ending a deduction the same thing as raising taxes? >> you have to look at the whole package. i mean i would think if you're going to -- and the other key thing here is, anybody -- >> is that a no? >> you have to -- first you have to look at the whole package and find out what's in it. to sit here and shoot at negotiating strategie
on the right last time just before the election when you saw a lot of people who just didn't believe the number, didn't want to believe it, but i think the growth in this number, the consumer confidence we've seen, some of the good trending economic data is part of the reason why barack obama won this election. consumers, job seekers are basically feeling a little bit better. the trend is good. i think that was the margin of difference here in large part for the president. >> i want to bring in our panel here and ben, you're an expert in all things related to the economy. ayman thinks these numbers have strengthened the president's hand here. i guess continuing in the vain of what's up is down and down is up, in some ways doesn't it sort of hurt the broader argument, though, from the left regarding unemployment benefits and the payroll tax cut? these are parts of the fiscal cliff negotiations we have not paid a lot of attention to, and also the white house's argument about further stimulus spending, undermined by this notion out there based on these numbers that the economy is recovering? >> ye
the debt ceiling. didn't hurt you? i think when you look at the results of the last election, yes, they held the house with a lot of redistricting but even with that redistricting i think that's going to be a lot tougher for them in two years if they do this. >> that is a really interesting point. the conventional wisdom is president obama ended up bloodied in that fight, ben, and in reality, i think you could take 2012 as a referendum on how that played out. >> absolutely. one of the things that's interesting about where we are here, we have something that's rare in washington which is a numerical accounting of where political leverage is. so we know where the starting point for boehner is. we know where the starting point for obama is. this is going to land, you know, 65% to obama, 75% to obama, and we'll be able to see where political leverage is right now. >> the pie is not cut up. luke russert, my friend, the sage of capitol hill, my celebrity doppelganger. >> check out melinda's column about notre dame. >> thank you. >> it is a good column. after the break, revenue on the ta
if it falls apa apart? >> yeah. they just won an election. their position on policies are much more popular than the republican positions are and they're willing to go over the cliff. going over the cliff for them is not the worst of all possible worlds. they get the tax position that they want, they get spending cuts that they can basically live with, and obama is capable of managing the economic fallout of it. that's another reason why i think it's important that geithner is the front man here, that geithner is the type of guy who can talk to the street in a way that's very assuring. >> the street, not the streets. >> yeah. >> also if they -- if we go over the cliff, i mean, the republicans then look like they let it happen all for the 2% as michael was saying because that's what this becomes about. that's not something they want. it doesn't put them in a good position. to some degree this is a choreographed dance that has to happen. they cannot come to a deal without a humongous fight. >> this is also the white house i think has managed the optics well on this and dubbed it the great rea
they have confidence in their ranks but they have won a general election on this platform, taxes need to go up for the very wealthy. so if you prepare to dpoeshiate hard, you prepared in theory to go over the cliff, the other side is in some disarray, you're going to get a deal. and the question is what other elements of the deal -- luke is right -- what other elements of the deal are in there? it's not a unilateral disarmament on all debt ceiling raises but the next debt ceiling raise has got to be in there, some element of unemployment in exchange for whatever horse trading they get. is it the upper 8, is it 39.5? >> 37%? >> 250,000, that's what congress does. it's horrible. it's a sausage making machine. you don't want to know what's in the sausage but the president has a strong hand and playing it as you expect him to. >> i mean, just to jump in quickly, he has to do it now because he doesn't want to repeat last time. >> i don't think -- nobody does, right? only the republicans do. they want the leverage. >> of course they do. i mean his point is, let me get it in now, even if it fails,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)